Latest News:

New Patient Paperwork

Please click below to download and print our new patient paperwork:

English | Español

Principles of the Medical Home Paperwork

Download now

Special Events

Description: Image result for psoriasis cartoon     Description: Image result for psoriasis cartoon


August is Psoriasis Information Month

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin.

It typically affects the outside of the elbows, knees or scalp, though it can appear on any location. Some people report that psoriasis is itchy, burns and stings. Psoriasis is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.
If you develop a rash that doesn't go away with an over-the-counter medication, you should consider contacting your doctor.

  • How do I get psoriasis?
  • How is psoriasis diagnosed?
  • What type of psoriasis do I have?
  • Where does psoriasis show up?
  • How severe is my psoriasis?
  • Will I develop psoriatic arthritis?
  • What about psoriasis in children?

  • How do I get psoriasis?

    While scientists do not know what exactly causes psoriasis, we do know that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development. Usually, something triggers psoriasis to flare. The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormally fast rate, which causes the buildup of psoriasis lesions. Men and women develop psoriasis at equal rates. Psoriasis also occurs in all racial groups, but at varying rates. About 1.9 percent of African-Americans have psoriasis, compared to 3.6 percent of Caucasians. Psoriasis often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, but it can develop at any age. About 10 to 15 percent of those with psoriasis get it before age 10. Some infants have psoriasis, although this is considered rare. Psoriasis is not contagious. It is not something you can "catch" or that others can catch from you. Psoriasis lesions are not infectious.

    How is psoriasis diagnosed?

    There are no special blood tests or tools to diagnose psoriasis. A dermatologist (doctor who specializes in skin diseases) or other health care provider usually examines the affected skin and determines if it is psoriasis. Your doctor may take a piece of the affected skin (a biopsy) and examine it under the microscope. When biopsied, psoriasis skin looks thicker and inflamed when compared to skin with eczema. Your doctor also will want to learn about your family history. About one-third of people with psoriasis have a family member with the disease, according to dermatologist Dr. Paul Yamauchi with the Dermatology and Skin Care Institute in Santa Monica, Calif.


    If you want to know more about healthy eating or need help with making healthy choices come by South Central Medical & Resource Center or call 405-756-1414 today.